The Big Pitch Film Festival 
Looking Through the Lens of Time

The Big Pitch Film Festival gives middle, junior, and high school students like you a way to explore your creativity and win great prizes as youproduce, direct, and star in a 27-second TV commercial.  This year, students are encouraged to reflect back on major events or decisions that have shaped your life.  You can’t always predict their outcome, but you are often aware of their consequences.  However, those who chose to smoke more than 50 years ago could not have imagined the devastating impact that smoking would have on their lives.  The first Surgeon General’s report changed all of that by directly connecting smoking to negative health consequences—a troubling “before” and “after” discovery.  

Recently, we celebrated the 50th Anniversary of the Surgeon General’s Report. This highlights the progress that has been made in tobacco control and the work that remains. This work puts you in a starring role. Choose one of the given topics from the rules and stick to it. Winning schools and teams will win great prizes, and winning commercials could air statewide.  Remember, the key to winning is being creative while still following the rules. Check out great tobacco-free websites provided at the bottom of the page where you can find current facts and statistics to use in your commercial.

Groups must address one of the following topics:

  • Using the latest Surgeon General’s report, “The Health Consequences of Smoking – 50 Years of Progress,” show how looking back on the history of tobacco control has influenced your decision to be smoke-free and work toward a tobacco-free future. Use the report to cite statistics, provide suggestions for ways to end the tobacco epidemic, or illustrate how Big Tobacco continues to manipulate youth.
  • Illustrate the physical side effects of smoking.  Demonstrate the “before” and “after” health consequences of smoking, or choose to highlight all of the activities/health benefits enjoyed by those who are smoke-free versus those who use tobacco. 
  • Show how smoking can impact the relationships you have with family and friends.  Maybe you spent more time with that person before they smoked. Or maybe because they chose to quit, your relationship with them has improved.  You can also illustrate the “before” and “after” of what it was, or might be like to lose someone important to you, due to smoking. 

Prizes for Winners

Each group’s commercial entry is separated into a division category for prizes. The divisions are based on the number of years your school has participated in The Big Pitch Film Festival.  Prizes among divisions are equal, and each division will award a first, second, and third place winning commercial.  If your commercial places, your school will receive money to purchase film equipment, and up to six members of your team will be awarded gift cards.  All entries within a division will be judged together to ensure equality.

Prizes for Winning Schools

Winning schools will receive money in the form of a gift card to purchase film equipment.

 BEGINNERINTERMEDIATEADVANCED
1st PLACE $1,500 Gift Card $1,500 Gift Card $1,500 Gift Card
2nd PLACE $750 Gift Card $750 Gift Card $750 Gift Card
3rd PLACE $375 Gift Card $375 Gift Card $375 Gift Card

Gift Cards for Winning Students

 BEGINNERINTERMEDIATEADVANCED
1st PLACE

$50 Visa gift card (up to 6 students)

$50 Visa gift card (up to 6 students)

$50 Visa gift card (up to 6 students)

2nd PLACE

$25 Visa gift card (up to 6 students)

$25 Visa gift card (up to 6 students)

$25 Visa gift card (up to 6 students)

3rd PLACE

$15 Visa gift card (up to 6 students)

$15 Visa gift card (up to 6 students)

$15 Visa gift card (up to 6 students)

PEOPLE'S CHOICE

$30 Visa gift card (up to 6 students)

 

 

The winners of the following categories will receive a $10 iTunes gift card:

  • Best Actor
  • Best Actress
  • Best Editing
  • Best Representation of Topic
  • Best Behind the Scenes Use of Social Media
  • Rookie of the Year
  • Best Use of Special Effects

Tips for Talking to Kids about Tobacco

COUNSELORS' & TEACHERS' TIPS FOR TALKING TO KIDS ABOUT TOBACCO.

Tips for Talking to Your Students About Tobacco

Leading Kids in the Right Direction

It’s a fact: Kids who use tobacco are more likely to use alcohol and other drugs such as cocaine and marijuana. Whether you’re a counselor, a coach, a teacher or a medical professional, you’re often in a position to exert more influence over a kid’s habits than you’d expect. And that goes for smoking, as well.

Here are several ways to put that influence to work for a smoke-free future…

  • Smoking slows lung growth, decreases lung function, and reduces the oxygen available for muscles used in sports. Players relate more to messages about the immediate effects of tobacco use (such as poorer athletic performance) than to its long-term health threats.
  • Smokers suffer from shortness of breath almost 3 times more often than nonsmokers. Whether your students are involved in sports, theater, debating, glee—or even study hall—find a way to make that knowledge relevant.
  • Nicotine is addictive in many of the ways heroin and cocaine are. Young people who do not start using tobacco by age 18 will most likely never start.
  • Spit tobacco and cigars are NOT safe alternatives to cigarettes; low-tar and additive-free tobacco products are not safe, either.
  • Tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death in the United States, causing heart and lung diseases, cancers, and strokes.
  • If you use tobacco, practice what you preach. Never use tobacco around the kids. Better yet, quit. Quitting sets the best example of all. Need help doing that? Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.
  • Adopt and enforce a tobacco-free policy for all participants in programs and sports on every level, even in the concessions. Make all environments tobacco-free—on the field and sidelines, backstage, on the practice podium, and in the stands. Send a copy of the tobacco-free policy home for parents to review.
  • Organize a no-smoking pledge. Have every member of the group sign it.
  • Announce and display tobacco-free messages at events.
  • Consider partnering with your local tobacco prevention programs. Voice your support for tobacco-free schools, sports, and other community events.
  • Announce and display tobacco-free messages at events.
  • Consider partnering with your local tobacco prevention programs. Voice your support for tobacco-free schools, sports, and other community events.

 

Download These Facts

PARENTS' TIPS FOR TALKING TO KIDS ABOUT TOBACCO. 

Tips for Talking to Your Kids About Tobacco

11 Steps in the Right Direction

As parents, we try hard to encourage smart, independent decision-making in our kids. What we forget is how much influence we can actually have. Here are 11 things to know, to do, to understand….

1. Talk directly to children about the risks of tobacco use. If friends or relatives have died from tobacco-related illnesses, talk about it.

2. Make sure that your discussions include the dangers of smokeless tobacco. High school star athlete Sean Marcee used spit tobacco. He died of oral cancer at 19.

3. If someone smokes in a movie or TV show you’re watching together, use the opportunity! Ask “What does smoking make you feel about that character? Why do you think they show smoking in that way?”

4. If you use tobacco, quitting sets the best example of all. Need help doing that? Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

But in the meantime …

  • don't use tobacco in your children's presence
  • don't offer it to them
  • don't leave it where they can easily get it.

5. Think that age 5 or 6 is too early to start the conversation? It isn’t. Many kids start using tobacco by age 11; many are addicted by age 14. And kids who use tobacco are more likely to use alcohol and other drugs such as cocaine and marijuana.

6. Know whether your kids' friends use tobacco. Talk about ways to refuse it—and help them understand that they don’t need to answer to anyone. Play the part of the persistent smoker-friend, guiding them with answers like these…

  • “I said no. So stop asking.”
  • “Smoking just isn’t who I am. And I wish you didn’t do it, either.”
  • “I just don’t like it, that’s all.”
  • “I just don’t like the smell. Or yellow teeth.”
  • “Smoking messes up my game/studying/concentration.”
  • “Let’s do _______ instead.”
  • “You know, we could have bought ___________ with the money you just spent on that pack.”
  • “My parents would kill me.”

7. Discuss with kids the false glamorization of tobacco on billboards and in other media, such as movies, TV, and magazines.

8. If you threaten punishment for smoking, be sure to follow up on it.

9. Vote with your pocketbook. Support businesses that don't sell tobacco to kids. Frequent restaurants and other places that are tobacco-free.

10. Be sure that your school and all school events (parties, sporting events, etc.) are tobacco-free.

11. Partner with local tobacco prevention programs. Call your local health department or your cancer, heart, or lung association to learn how to get involved.

DOWNLOAD THESE FACTS

Tutorials on How to Shoot a Video

We want to make sure you have the resources to produce the best commercial you possibly can.  Below are some tutorial videos on shooting and editing commercials.  The videos provide excellent tips, and whether you're a beginner or advanced, you'll benefit from watching these videos.  Check them out; it's well worth it! 

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